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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/20/2019 in Posts

  1. 2 points
    Today marks 422 days approximately until the next bitcoin 'halving', where the amount of bitcoin that is able to be mined every day is cut in half forever. The approximate date will be 24 May 2020. After previous bitcoin booms and busts in the hype cycle the uptick in the price has started to show improvement around 500 days before the halving. We are past that point, so I am hoping that there will start to be a slow steady increase in price again like there has been before. Lets see if history will repeat itself once again. The Bitcoin block mining reward halves every 210,000 blocks, and this time the coin reward will decrease from 12.5 to 6.25 coins approximately every 10min in May 2020. Usually there are guys who anticipate the increased demand and the price increase that responds to the demand, who buy in advance so that they can sell when the real frenzy starts at a great profit. I would bet that if things go like they have gone in the past, people will buy up bitcoin leading up to the halving, and might even dump a bunch before the actual date, before other guys get a chance to do the same thing. Lets see how it all plays out... EDIT:
  2. 2 points
    Option 1: Takealot for around R1680 Option 2: From their site for R976 + customs/import (https://shop.ledger.com/products/ledger-nano-s) Free shipping from DHL (3 business days) Question: Does anyone know what the import costs will be payable on this? Read around that in SA it could be around 15% VAT and 10% Duty = +25% (total costs R1220) Are there other costs? If R1220 is the case it's a way better deal to buy direct plus you can choose your Nano S color (I want Transparent )
  3. 2 points
    I have ordered single units as replacements which came without having to pay extra duties. Buying bulk means you definitely have to pay the duties, and also the fee to the courier company to 'process' your order and delivery. I am out of stock of Ledger Nano S devices and most likely not ordering bulk again, unless I can make it worth while. Bulk orders are not priority to them, so they sometimes take months to arrive, while the price of bitcoin changes drastically during that time period, which means your profit can disappear completely. For the end user, its faster and cheaper to just order directly from Ledger now, especially since they added free shipping for small orders to South Africa, and you might not need to pay duties. Bulk orders you still need to pay for shipping, so that is additional cost for resellers too. The time, expenses, and possibility of losing money means its just better to refer customers to them directly.
  4. 2 points
    Weakening economic conditions, increased debt repayment burden, rising consumer inflation and stricter lending criteria have seen 100% bonds, especially to first-time buyers, become much harder to get, but it has also placed many potential buyers firmly between a rock and a hard place. “Not only do banks require bigger deposits than before, it has also become more difficult to put money aside in today’s economic climate, as growing financial pressure is forcing consumers to tighten belts even further just to make ends meet,” says JP van der Bergh, founder of Propscan. "However, a sizeable deposit has several significant benefits in addition to increasing your chance of bond approval - it also gives you a jumpstart on the financial process, makes your offer more appealing to sellers as it bumps up the chance of bond approval, naturally decreases your monthly bond repayments, and saves you a considerable amount in interest over the long term.” Kay Geldenhuys from ooba, national mortgage originator, illustrates how a deposit can reduce the overall and monthly costs of buying property: “A home buyer who purchases a house for R1 million with no deposit at a 10.25% interest rate will pay approximately R9 816 per month over 20 years. At the end of the home loan term, the total amount repaid will be R2 355 944. “On the other hand, with a R100 000 deposit, the monthly repayments will be approximately R8 835, and the total repayment will be around R2 120 350. Add the deposit to this and the total comes to R2 220 350 - making the total repayments some R135 594 cheaper than buying without a deposit.” She says it also stands to reason that the smaller the risk for the bank, the more negotiable they will be on the interest rate charged. “Right from the beginning of the home-buying process, it is important to ensure that you know what you can afford to buy and how much deposit you will need,” says Van der Bergh. “Once you have established how much you need to save, the next step is to figure out how to do so as quickly as possible, and in order to do so, you must analyse your spending habits. On a spreadsheet, list all your fixed monthly expenses including existing debts you are currently servicing and make a note of all other regular expenses like the daily cappuccino at the café near work. “Next, go through it with a fine-tooth comb to see where you can cut down on monthly expenditure and determine how much you can realistically afford to save, and then shop around for a high-interest savings or money market account in which to save your money.” Sandy Geffen, Executive Director of Lew Geffen Sotheby’s International Realty in South Africa, says saving a substantial amount of money may seem like a daunting task, but don’t be discouraged. “At first glance, the cutbacks you are able to make may seem to be small amounts, but you will be surprised at how quickly they can add up to a sizeable sum, and you could own your first home sooner than you think,” says Geffen. She offers the following creative tips for saving towards your deposit: 1. Stop smoking. This could add at least R1 000 a month to your deposit fund. 2. Instead of buying takeaways every day, rather spend the extra 10 minutes packing lunch in the morning as it will end up saving you more than pennies at the end of the day, and it’s far healthier. 3. Ask for an insurance re-evaluation because while your insurance premiums probably go up every year, the value of a lot of insured items actually goes down as they age. 4. Cut back on credit and try to pay off and close store cards, especially if you find temptation hard to resist. Remember that when you do eventually apply for a loan, the bank will ask for an income and expenditure statement to prove that you will have sufficient surplus income for the home loan instalment once all household and contractual debt expenses have been met. 5. Before you run out to buy a new seasonal wardrobe, spring clean your closet and unearth the older items of good quality that can be reinvented with accessories or by mixing and matching; 6. If you can’t remember what the inside of your gym looks like and can’t motivate yourself to go, cancel that gym contract and find ways to exercise for free. It might help you to start exercising more regularly, especially now that summer is here. 7. Consider scaling down on your car if a large portion of your monthly income is going towards paying off a car loan; 8. Always go grocery shopping with a list and stick to it - and never go on an empty stomach. Also try and stick to food stores and avoid the hypermarkets where you might be tempted to buy other things you don’t need. Geldenhuys cautions that this savings mindset should not be abandoned once the goal has been met. “Many people throw caution to the wind and shop around for a home that costs the maximum amount the bank has approved, however, given current economic conditions, buyers should rather consider buying for a little less,” says Geldenhuys. “The extra cash can be used to pay off the bond more quickly or saved as a rainy-day fund so that they are prepared for the unforeseen expenses which arise when you own property.” “It’s true that our parents had it much easier in that most were able to afford their first home long before the current average age of first-time buyers which has risen to 34, but what hasn’t changed is the investment value of owning a home,” says Van der Bergh. “It is also one of the most exciting and rewarding purchases you will ever make, so even though it may take a little longer, it’s always worth the effort.” Source: Property24
  5. 1 point
    Trading in the Zone - Mark Douglas. Incredible book. Not on TA but on the lures and dangers of trading, taking responsibility, consistency: state of mind, the dynamics of perception, the markets perspective, thinking in probabilities, working with your beliefs, the nature of beliefs, the impact of believes on trading and thinking like a trader. So many lessons that will save you from yourself... I try reread it at least twice yearly.
  6. 1 point
    Hi There, I'm Ahmed, Longtime mybb lurker, and about to sign a contract with one of the big 4 mobile networks in their graduate programme as a software engineer. Thought Id lurk on this forum too, and get my finances right from the start ; ) hopefully.. Hope I can learn and contribute meaningfully.
  7. 1 point
    So DHL called me and said I have to pay Extra costs were a total of R312. Total cost for Ledger Nano S = R1288. I'll take it. Cheers guys! Dan
  8. 1 point
    Right now its cheaper to just buy direct from Ledger than from any retailer in South Africa because you get free shipping.
  9. 1 point
    The education system seems to be going through changes. There is a trend towards home schooling and small colleges in some sectors of the community, away from the formal uniform wearing "conventional" schools. Teacher education is in a bad shape and the quality of teachers seems to be deteriorating. The discipline in the conventional schools is going from bad to worse. Yes the private school system is facing an uncertain future but it seems to be a better bet than the state schools and even the old model "C" schools which are going the same way as the majority. Affordability of the private schools is a problem especially in the light of the current low economic activity prevalent in the country. Pembury claim to be more affordable than the groups mentioned above. As far as retirement homes are concerned I have noticed a trend for emigrated children to arrange for their aged parents to join them overseas thus reducing the pool of tenants for these homes. Time will tell what happens to this share.
  10. 1 point
    A friend of mine drives a Hyundai i10, but I can't seem to find info on Motus since it's so young and the analysts are not all over it. Where do the sales of a Hyundai or a Kia then fit into the profits of the company?
  11. 1 point
    I only do CFDs for resources, because they're cyclic so long term doesn't make sense for me with resources. But I've had CFDs in Anglo American Platinum (AMS) for about 3-4 months now. Best return I've ever made on a trade!
  12. 1 point
    @SaurusDNA I read you guys' comments now about Motus, I like the idea I also think with the economy the way it is that more and more of these 'cheaper' brands will become the norm on SA roads. I was in Canal Walk last night and saw a brand new Hyundai i10 go for R2050 per month. I think most new university students who start working will be able to afford this. I decided to buy R3k worth of shares in Motus, now we probably need a dedicated thread
  13. 1 point
    I still have an active subscription to Popular Mechanics (Although i get the digital version as part of my subscription) It's true that the content is mostly outdated, or that most information is available on the internet, but i must be honest i do look forward sitting on the potty with my PM. Heck, we still have a magazine holder in our loo.
  14. 1 point
    Hi. Platinum Wealth asked me to comment on unit trusts vs ETFs. The first thing is that unit trusts can be managed actively eg. Allan Gray, or passively, eg. Sygnia Top40 Index Fund or Sygnia Skeleton Balanced 70 Fund. All ETFs are passively managed, tracking particular market indices. I will limit my comparison to passive unit trusts vs ETFs. In South Africa unit trusts are significantly more cost effective than ETFs - so a Top40 Index tracking unit trust is significantly cheaper than a Top40 Index tracking ETF. The reason is that to access a unit trusts you only have to pay the management fees and trading costs (all disclosed on fund fact sheets). That is it. If you do not use a financial advisor, that is all you pay. In fact, with Sygnia's index tracking unit trusts, if you want to invest via a retirement annuity or a tax free savings account, those charge nil administration fees. In terms of ETFs you have to pay multiple layers of fees before you can actually access an ETF. The reason is that ETFs are both unit trusts and "shares" listed on the JSE. Some of these fees are: - Stockbroking fees every time you buy or sell an ETF (you have to use a stockbroker) - JSE trading costs relating to ETFs themselves - Management fees within the ETFs - Bid/offer spreads between buy prices and sell prices (This is the most disingenuous aspect of ETFs - the price of an ETF at a point in time is subject to supply and demand by investors, like any other share. So you might be paying more for the ETF than the value of the underlying "index" shares it holds, and when you sell you might be selling for less than the "index" shares are worth. In South Africa, where liquidity is poor, the market maker normally steps in. A market maker makes his money from the bid/offer spreads. So realistically 1% to 3% spreads are common). - If you want to invest via debit order, you are normally sold an "investment plan" by a platform like etfSA or iTransact. That is another 0.70% pa fee plus R3.50 per month debit order fee. - If you want a savings product, like a retirement annuity, that costs another 0.50% pa plus. So once you have added all the costs of accessing ETFs you are paying more than you would for an actively managed unit trust. That is what the ETF providers are skirting around all the time. Since Sygnia always does things differently, we plan to launch ETFs later this year where we charge nil stockbroking and we guarantee a minimum bid/offer spread. Let's see if we can shake things up a bit. But frankly, even with best intentions, I don't think our ETFs will be as cheap as our unit trusts tracking the same market indices. The final comment is that ETFs are asset class specific e.g. equities, bonds. Sygnia Skeleton Funds on the other hand mix asset classes together in sensible proportions for different risk profiles. So by holding one index tracking investment you get exposure to both domestic and International equities and bonds. Hope this helps. If you have any questions, I will answer them. Magda Wierzycka CEO Sygnia
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