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  1. So I have been planning my Tax Free Investment Account portfolio for 2021 and this is what I've decided to buy in the year ahead in terms of my ETF picks: Composition: 70% Offshore Equities 20% Local Equities 10% Local Property My portfolio will then look as follows: Offshore (70%): ASHEQF: 25% STXEMG: 25% STXNDQ: 10% SYG4IR: 10% Local (30%): STX40: 7% NFEMOM: 7% STXQUA: 7% CSPROP: 10% The local picks may seem strange at 7% each, but I cannot decide between the three local equity ETFs. NFEMOM has done very well in terms of local ETFs and will probably continue to shine. STX40 contains the more resilient stocks that are most likely do perform best in difficult times. And STXQUA, well, I just love the composition of shares in the basket. My TFIA already contains ETFs in the composition above, so I'll just continue to buy in the same ratio.
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  2. It's that time of year again - albeit a very unusual year! So my personal top five stock pics for next year are as follows (in order): #1) DGH (Distell) - This one's share price has been hammered by the lockdowns and stocks are dirt cheap. But drinking never stops and eventually, sales and profits always return. This company is also huge and very resilient. If I had to choose just one stock for the coming year, it would be this one. #2) APN (Aspen) - With an agreement to produce a COVID vaccine, the exposure to this company should be massive once they begin production. #3) PPC (PPC Cement) - This one is tricky, because they have a significant debt problem to solve. If they fix their debt problem, they could be at R6.00 by the end of 2021. If they don't, they could be at 60c. But this year has been fantastic for the company. They have increased profits and reduced debt considerably. If they keep it up, good things are in store for this company. #4) DCP (Dischem) - Dis-Chem has launched it's new innovative Clinic Connect - a nurse-led healthcare system where nurses take your vitals and symptoms etc., and can video-chat a Doctor for a script should one be required, with clinic visits being substantially cheaper than Doctor visits, and you can still get a prescription. If this takes off, this could do wonders for the group. #5) SSS (Store-Age) - Largely unaffected by COVID, because people who rent storage keep renting the storage, even during tough times. With a dividend yield at over 8% and good financials, this one is bread and butter, even through terrible times. Other notable mentions: CML - Coronation L4L - Long4Life CPI - Capitec DSY - Discovery SRE - Sirius
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  3. ETNs: FirstRand have listed 9 Exchange Traded Notes on large US stocks on the JSE (plus one on MSCI World) Google (Alphabet) Amazon Apple Coke Facebook McDonalds Microsoft Netflix Tesla Each stock has 2 codes: With exposure to the USD/ZAR (C) or without (Q). Note that with an ETN you carry the counter-party risk that the issuer will not fulfill its obligations. With FSR/RMB you should be pretty safe, although their market making is less than desirable. Dividends are not paid out but are reinvested and added to the NAV of the ETN. Source:
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  4. To support economic recovery, government will not raise any additional tax revenue in this budget. The personal income tax brackets and rebates will increase above the inflation rate of 4 per cent. Government will increase excise duties on alcohol and tobacco by 8 per cent for 2021/22. Inflation-related increases of 15c/litre and 11c/litre will be implemented for the general fuel levy and the RAF levy, respectively, with effect from 7 April 2021. The UIF contribution ceiling will be set at R17 711.58 per month from 1 March 2021.
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  5. Budget Tax Guide 2021.pdf2021-Full-Budget-Review.pdfBudget 2021 Estimates Of National Expenditure.pdf
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  6. Never heard of it. For a high frequency trading bot I have setup Hummingbot which is created by traders for traders, and is open source and created with python. You can run it on your PC, or what I did was setup an instance on Amazon that can stay on 24/7 and trade. Hummingbot can connect via API to all the big exchanges, and I also have it setup to connect to ice3 locally. You can do Pure Market Making, Cross Exchange Market Making, Arbitrage etc. all the usual stuff. There is a bunch of great youtube videos by the guys who made it where they show you how to use its features. Check it out here: https://hummingbot.io/
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  7. Simon Brown always says that before you buy any stock, you should clearly be able to give three reasons why you want to buy the stock, and be prepared to stay in the trade for as long as those conditions are valid. If you can give three compelling reasons, and there are no cautionary announcements on the stock, sure, go ahead and buy the stock. However, with any penny stock, it wouldn't be prudent to buy than 10% of your shares portfolio. Otherwise it's no different to gambling.
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  8. Well, once again, Rhodium was on a different planet to everything else, with the 1nvest Rhodium ETF (ETFRHO) delivering growth of 187.1%. Originally, the reason for the stellar growth of Rhodium was the change from platinum catalysts to rhodium in the auto industry, but now I suspect that it is purely momentum. I wonder how long this can go on. Every year, I think the performance cannot be repeated and then each year is better than the last. It's kind of like Bitcoin at the moment. It could collapse at any time or could go past the moon. The top 10 performing ETFs in South Africa tracking market indices for 2020 were: SYG4IR: 68.1% (Sygnia Itrix 4th Industrial Revolution Global Equity ETF) STXNDQ: 56.1% (Satrix Nasdaq 100 ETF) ETF5IT: 49.9% (1nvest S&P 500 Info Tech ETF) SYGUS: 26.3% (Sygnia Itrix MSCI USA ETF) STX500: 24.3% (Satrix S&P 500 ETF) STXEMG: 24.2% (Satrix MSCI Emerging Markets ETF) SYG500: 23.8% (Sygnia Itrix S&P 500 ETF) ETF500: 23.0% (1nvest S&P 500 ETF) CSP500: 22.7% (CoreShares S&P 500 ETF) STXWDM: 22.0% (Satrix MSCI World ETF) Source: https://www.moneyweb.co.za/investing/etfs-investing/local-etf-returns-is-the-market-mood-shifting/ Once again, SYG4IR has had amazing performance despite having many critics in the financial world. I think with ETFs, popular is good, and as long as it remains popular, it will keep growing. In a way, I think it's similar to Rhodium - growth can carry on for many years as long as there is momentum. Also, as predicted, STXNDQ did finally overtake ETF5IT. I personally don't like ETF5IT since roughly 40% is made up of just two companies - Microsoft and Apple. I just don't see how these two companies can continue repeating their stellar financial results of 2020 year after year, but then you never know. Interesting that all of them are offshore this year - Bandit was right with his prediction. So what are your predictions for 2021? My guess is that there will be a strong rebound in local property, but let's wait and see...
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  9. If you feel you lack discipline, why not set up a recurring contribution to your ETF fund via debit order? Even a small monthly amount. You'll get the benefit of cost price averaging AND the peace of mind that you're putting away that money every month before you eat out and waste it on unneccessary stuff. Then if you want to diversify, you can always take out an additional RA.
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  10. Been another month, and today bitcoin broke through $20k, reaching a new All Time High! So far the bitcoin price is still sticking pretty close to the predicted price using the S2F model. If things continue on the same path, then 2021 is going to be an amazing year for bitcoin. So far this year has already seen great returns for bitcoin holders. This thread started with bitcoin priced at around $4k, and today it has breached $20k. Not bad at all. The last few months has seen some major players / institutions buying into bitcoin and finally joining in the party. EG: MicroStrategy first bought $250 million in bitcoin (BTC) on Aug. 11, followed by an additional $175 million worth of BTC one month later. Michael Saylor then purchased 2,574 bitcoins for $50.0 million in cash bringing the business intelligence company’s treasury holdings to approximately 40,824 bitcoins. The $475 million of excess cash in the cryptocurrency, has pushed Nasdaq-listed MSTR shares higher for weeks Now MicroStrategy has raised $650 million to buy even more bitcoin, bringing its total exposure to bitcoin to approx $1.1 billion. DBS Bank of Singapore has officially announced the arrival of its digital assets exchange, with trading to start next week. The DBS Digital Exchange is 10% owned by Singapore’s SGX stock exchange. It will also provide tokenization of securities and other assets, as well as bank-grade custody for digital assets. The new exchange will facilitate spot exchanges from fiat currencies to cryptocurrencies and vice versa Ruffer Investment (UK) did a Massive Bitcoin Buy of $744M - "Ruffer's exposure to bitcoin currently totals around £550m, equivalent to around 2.7% of the firm's assets under management" MassMutual, a U.S. life insurance company with $567 billion of assets under management announced that they purchased $100 million in Bitcoin for their general investment account. MassMutual noted that the investment is part of a broad strategy, with the goal of achieving “measured yet meaningful exposure to a growing economic aspect of our increasingly digital world." PayPal is also launching a new service enabling users to buy, hold and sell cryptocurrency. PayPal will enable cryptocurrency as a funding source for digital commerce at its 26 million merchants... Square buys $50 million in bitcoin, and says cryptocurrency ‘aligns with company’s purpose’ "Square said Thursday it bought 4,709 bitcoins, worth approximately $50 million." This represents about 1% of Square’s total assets as of the end of the second quarter of 2020. “Square believes that cryptocurrency is an instrument of economic empowerment and provides a way for the world to participate in a global monetary system, which aligns with the company’s purpose,” the company said in a release. Soooooooooooo what do all the 'big brains' in these companies know that the masses dont?? I think this year coming is going to be insane....lots of bitcoin press and the price will reach amazing new all time highs...but lets see how it all plays out. Luckily we are all front running these big guys, and have been dollar cost averaging into bitcoin for ages....
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  11. I will attach all the Black Friday deals to this post, as they become available. Makro-Black-Friday-2020.pdf Incredible-Connection-Black-Friday-2020-Deals.pdf 14595_02_Nov_2020_BF_VERSION 6.pdf Hifi-corporation-black-friday.pdf Vodacom-black-friday-2020.pdf Game _ 28 Black Fridays Week 2 (11 November - 17 November 2020).pdf HiFi-corporation-week-2.pdf
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  12. If you have the Capitec app already, make sure you have the latest version. Visit the App Store or Play Store and give that Update button a tap. Once you have the latest version of the app, log in and navigate to where it says ‘Explore’, then select ‘Widgets’. You’ll then select EasyEquities and go through the process of either linking your existing EasyEquities account or creating a new one.
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  13. Well, I started the year with a savings challenge too - I started with R10 in week 1, R20 in week 2, R30 in week 3 etc. straight into a Tyme bank account that I opened for that purpose. Was getting 9% earlier this year, now 6%. Still going strong - haven't missed a weekly payment yet.
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  14. Motorists and taxpayers appear set to become the cash cow to enable the government to reduce its percentage of the funding of the multi-billion rand expansion of the Gautrain. Gautrain Management Agency (GMA) CEO William Dachs said on Monday: “We firmly believe the people in cars don’t pay their fair share in terms of the taxes that they pay and the failure of the e-tolls system has perpetuated that problem.” Dachs was commenting on the GMA’s engagement with National Treasury about the sources of funding for the Gautrain expansion project and the need to move people off the roads and away from carbon intensive modes of transport during a virtual panel discussion on the ‘Future of Rapid Rail in Gauteng and its Impact on Social and Economic Development’. He said the GMA started its engagement with Treasury on the funding of the expansion with “a clean sheet of paper and [to] look at all the possible sources”. “We looked at everything from general tax increases to fuel taxes to fuel levies to congestion charges, which haven’t happened in South Africa yet, all the way through to the more traditional funding sources,” said Dachs. “We also looked at developer charges, bearing in mind that people who develop around existing Gautrain stations have seen massive increases in the values of their properties. Most viable source “We then did a quite detailed analysis of what each source could bring and which one of them would be the most viable,” he said. Dachs did not comment on which of these sources was the most viable but said: “We would be looking at a blend of national government funding, provincial government funding, people who use the trains, private developers contribution as well as those who invest in the train itself.” He confirmed that vehicle licence fees had been considered during the GMA’s engagement with Treasury but stressed that: “It’s not an infinite source.” “Gauteng can’t become uncompetitive in terms of its vehicle licences compared to other provinces but there is a strong case to be made there,” he said. Dachs said there is a strong willingness from private sector developers to invest in new stations provided they are transit orientated developments from which they can get a return. He said they were obviously also looking at getting private sector investment in the infrastructure itself “because the people who use the trains will pay for them”. ‘Massive misconception’ Dachs stressed that there is a “massive misconception” that the people who use the current Gautrain are massively subsidised in terms of the operations cost, which is untrue. He said there was a “close to 100% recovery” of the operating costs of the Gautrain from the money people pay to use it although “Covid-19 messed that up”. Dachs said this high operating cost recovery rate goes a long way towards the long term financial sustainability of the Gautrain. “The government subsidy to date has really been around the capital part of the Gautrain and we would look to continue that going forward,” he said. Gauteng provincial borrowings and provincial budget allocations via national government accounted for 88% of the total cost of the first phase development of the Gautrain, with private sector debt only accounting for about 12% balance of the cost. Reports have suggested the government wants to reduce its funding of the Gautrain expansion to 33% while former GMA CEO Jack van der Merwe said last year the plan was to increase private sector funding to 33%. The GMA submitted plans about the Gautrain expansion programme to National Treasury in 2017. Robust engagement But Dachs stressed on Monday that Treasury did not cause a delay in the project and the GMA has had a real, good and robust engagement with Treasury about this huge and complex project. He said two issues kept arising during these engagements: how to make it more accessible to more people without compromising its financial sustainability, and how it can be funded. “It can’t just be 100% government funding. How do we build a private sector investment in here? How do we encourage people who benefit from a project like this to also contribute to it financially? “We have answered those questions. It’s been a two-and-a-half year process in terms of engagement on it and, as we speak, we are just finishing the final study,” he said. Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) head of transport and logistics Cyprian Marowa said the DBSA is good at bringing together many institutions into the lending space. Marowa said no individual bank can single-handedly develop infrastructure like the Gautrain and the DBSA is seen globally as a good partner for other institutions to come in and be part of the infrastructure projects in South Africa. He admitted that Covid-19 has been “a spanner in the works” and money generally has become more expensive, with some projects delayed. But Marowa said it is important “to keep your eye on the ball and take a long term view”. ‘Good project for any investor’ Marowa said that if the number of cash flows that could be generated from different aspects of the Gautrain expansion project are aggregated “you find that this would turn out to be a very good project for any investor”. Transport analyst and economist Ofentse Hlulani Mokwena said there is a need for the government and other funders to be very conscious of the kind of risks they expose themselves to from a funding perspective because this will change the dynamics of their returns. Mokwena said there will certainly be some controversial funding options and some options that are more attractive and more acceptable to the public. He said this is something the government will have to balance, especially in order to negotiate a good allocation risk. Mokwena added that the key issue is whether there are viable alternatives and whether this service will be attached to the existing system. “That is going to be crucial because what you want is to be able … to ring-fence financing … and to justify that you have to have public buy-in. “That is going to be crucial because with a project of this scale, the last thing you will want is risk on the infrastructure, on the programme, or even at a political level. “So whatever the financing options that are decided on or pursued, the key here is to contain and manage the risk,” he said. Deeper relationships? Mokwena said there is also the risk of modal exclusion or parallelism and questioned why there was not a deeper relationship with, for example, bike sharing schemes, mini bus taxis and the existing bus services. He said these modes of transport are essentially part of the discussion to justify digging into the public financing environment. “It’s not just about the project but being able to manage the public perception, the allocation risk and making sure the project retains its social, economic and political viability. The numbers count but there is a lot more to it,” he said. The current Gautrain network comprises 80km of rail along two route links: a link between Tshwane and Johannesburg and a link between OR Tambo International Airport and Sandton. The expansion comprises another 150km of rail and a further 19 stations. Dachs said the single conclusion the Gauteng provincial government came to in 2014 when it started working on its 25-year integrated transport master plan is that moving people to and from jobs in perpetuity on the roads is not going to work and rail has to be the backbone of a public transport system. He said the five-phase Gautrain expansion plan was a very ambitious long term plan and this massive build programme will take 20 to 30 years to complete. Source: Moneyweb
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  15. Ja nee what a load of bull. Fuel tax, emissions tax, annual road tax but most importantly - FUEL TAX. You get that they want to build a "first world country" but to do that you need a tax base that can support it and for that to happen you need to give people jobs so that they 1) contribute to tax and 2) not rely on grants. Before you can do any of these projects that require tax money - get people to work. Attract foreign investors, give them tax breaks or some sort of incentive to setup shop here and employ South Africans.
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  16. For cellphones, you can download the free version of the TrueCaller App (from Google Play Store) that has very effective spam and advertising blocking capabilities. I've been using it for a few months now and I hardly get spam calls anymore on my cell phone.
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  17. 44% of my monthly investments goes into RA’s and 56% into ETF's. Major portion of all RA’s are invested in the SA stock market. In in my local ETF portfolio I have monthly investments in Satrix Quality SA (2000.00), Coreshares SA Property Income (1500.00) and a TFSA in Satrix Divi Plus (1375.00). As RA’s are heavily invested in SA, should I terminate my monthly investments in all SA ETF’s and increase my contributions to Satrix MSCI World and Coreshares Global DivTrax.
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  18. Knowing what I know now I would do it again. Make no mistake, it could've ended badly but for some reason I had very little doubt that it will work out in my favour. Still scary. 1. Cashing out pension Still happy I did it. We have plans to cash out my wife's as well. We are planning to move offshore for a bit (permanently?) but even if we didn't I have do not have enough faith in our government and Reg 28 to provide us with a retirement. Retirement is still 30 years away though. I'd rather sort it out myself. I would never suggest to anybody to cash out their pension (it could be the worst mistake you ever make) but personally I have no love for reg 28. 2. Panic selling This wasn't panic selling. I saw an opportunity and took a calculated risk. All the money was reinvested. Yes I took the opportunity to rebalance but I invested in the same "philosophy" - not in SA. Panic selling implies that one has no plan and making rash decisions. *I bought back in over a couple of days but that's the rough idea. When I bought back in I thought we hit bottom already, but obviously not. 3. RA So I moved my RA to Allan Gray in 2018. As a result the fund is split in two exact same funds - one that just sits there and one for new deposits. This is the lump sum with no additional deposits' performance: Since inception: -0.49% 4. Not adding anymore to RA I've stopped all deposits to my RA btw. Investing that money into my own investments. My new portfolio is up 6.59% over the last 6 months which is not spectacular but the investments are diverse and not bound to reg28 constraints.
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  19. I'm curious if you've reviewed your rationale recently now that the waters have temporarily calmed. Do you still think you were thinking clearly or do you recognize a little bit of the recency bias and nihilism that drove the choices you made here? I'm speaking with regards to: 1. Cashing out your pension (!) 2. Panic selling from a passively managed portfolio (As an aside, who exactly was "trying to take your money"? 3. Staying invested (due to admin inertia) in the RA while thinking there was no way it could recover (I'm curious to know if it did and if so/not what exactly is your RA invested in and have you looked to tighten up there?) 4. Not wanting to add more to your RA while everything was on sale For the sake of fairness, I'll be transparent that I did nothing during the crash. Literally nothing. Everyone around me was tinkering and saying that I was crazy continuing with business as usual but I just couldn't understand why an investment plan that I made when I was calm and rational, specifically to whether the longterm (a longterm that EXPECTED crashes and "once in a lifetime" global events) needed to suddenly be abandoned. I don't regret that decision. A part of me wishes I'd taken on more shifts so that I could buy more during the dip, but again that wasn't part of my longterm plan so I felt silly even considering it. Even excluding rand weakness, my portfolio is essentially where it was precrash. My RA is shining too... with its 70% local. I think the financial consequences of the last 9 months are far from over but my plan remains the same. If there's anything this storm taught me it's that you have to build a plan that matches your risk tolerance or you'll be prone to making decisions in the heat of the moment that contradict that plan. I'm curious if yours has changed at all with a bit of the tailwinds behind us and a bit more perspective? I think it would be a useful update.
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  20. Just a update on ASHGEQ: The proposed restructuring was approved by the majority of shareholders.This means that ASHGEQ will now become a feeder fund (owning the ETFs that make up the index rather than owning the individual companies). So while the index will remain exactly the same, the management costs and TER for ASHGEQ should now come down significantly. The individual constituents comprising the S&P Global 1200 Index are: iShares Core S&P 500 ETF iShares MSCI Europe UCITS ETF EUR Dist iShares S&P/TSX 60 Index ETF iShares Core TOPIX ETF iShares Asia 50 ETF iShares Latin America 40 ETF SPDR S&P/ASX 50 Fund (Source: ASHGEQ SENS announcement 11 August 2020)
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  21. He's probably right but who cares - it's making me money
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  22. So let's see: TFSA +28% ETF5IT (42%) ASHGEQ (55%) STXEMG (3%) The growth here was helped by timing the crash and dip earlier this year and time. Portfolio #1 +8% SYGWD (27%) SYG4IR (42%) STXCHN (31%) Portfolio was started after the crash, so gains are partly due to the recovery (maybe?) and the recent growth we've seen over the last week. Portfolio #2 +77% ETFRHO (95%) DCX10 (5%) Ah yes, portfolio 2. Otherwise known as my **** around portfolio. Growth is largely from past performance of ETFRHO and it's been stuck in the +70 range for a while. I reckon the party is over but scared of capital gains.
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  23. So this year, the markets have gone crazy, but not altogether bad from an ETF point of view. However, the more the markets do wild things, the more I've been inclined to go for vanilla ETFs. I think I've only made one or two big changes since last year, namely selling my Coreshare's SMART ETF in favour of the Satrix Top 40, and then reducing my allocation of property (CSPROP) from 25% to 15% (I didn't sell - I'm just not buying at the moment until it's less than 15% of my total portfolio.) I used the extra 10% allocation from property to buy Satrix Nasdaq (STXNDQ). So at the moment, most ETFs are doing really well, especially the foreign ones. My Tax Free investment portfolio and it's performance (total return) looks as follows: Local ETFs (Total 45%): 10% Satrix Top 40 (STX40) - Performance in my portfolio: +0% 10% Newfunds Momentum (NFEMOM) - Performance: +7% 10% Satrix Quality (STXQUA) - Performance: -10% (Even though this is currently down, I don't want to sell this because I love the shares in this basket and see long term potential.) 15% Coreshares Property (CSPROP) - Performance: -22% (Would be much worse if not for the massive dividends). Foreign ETFs (Total 55%): 25% Ashburton Global 1200 (ASHGEQ) - Performance: +22% 10% Satrix Emerging Markets (STXEMG) - Performance: +27% 10% Satrix Nasdaq (STXNDQ) - Performance: +44% 10% Sygnia 4th Industrial Revolution (SYG4IR) - Performance: +51% ( I know Simon Brown always slams this one as just being popular rather than having actual merit, but it's been my best performing ETF and continues to perform, despite the measly dividends. I don't think I'd be comfortable with it being more than 10% of my portfolio though.) Things that I've noticed that have happened in my portfolio this year: Foreign markets have vastly outperformed local markets this year. Emerging market are outperforming developed markets this year, despite COVID (to be expected in the long term, but surprising given the current pandemic.) Tech ETFs are outperforming everything else by far. Changes that I'm going to make: I'm going to buy some Satrix China (STXCHN) after its launch tomorrow, but I don't think I'll put it in my TFIA, as it would go against my diversification policy within my TFIA. But I'm definitely going to buy a fair amount of this ETF outside of my TFIA.
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  25. "Trace" amounts, surely. I don't think we're losing out that much at all. Those offshore ETFs paying dividends etc have crappy payouts anyway.
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  26. For RA's, I'd go for a company like Allan Gray or Alexander Forbes. Companies like Old Mutual , Sanlam and Liberty Life are also reputable, but their fees tend to be higher and their returns lower in my experience (although you should do some research first to verify the facts.) I think Bandit has hit on something very, very important. If you see a financial adviser, the first thing they will try and do is sell you life insurance, because the commission on that is huge compared to the commission on an RA. Don't give in - tell them you want an RA and nothing else at this stage.
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  27. Thanks Saurus, most definitely take what you have said into consideration! I like emerging markets but I feel like with most of my exposure to SA I should probably not put as much as I like into them. Doing some research now into the other funds you mentioned!
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  28. thanks so much @SaurusDNA
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  29. "GLODIV has been doing really well lately and is likely to continue. Not so great in a TFIA though as the unpleasantly high foreign withholding tax on dividends negates a large chunk of the tax benefits though, but it still does have excellent capital gains, so maybe still even worth having in a TFIA." are the dividends taxed in a tax free savings account? foreign and local?
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  30. The 70% equities, 20% property and 10% interest bearing is the classic split. But yes, I suppose 10% dividends would make it 80% equities. But there's certainly nothing wrong with 80% equities! I'm torn between STX40 and SMART. I really like a 50/50 split between these two. PTXTEN is now merging with PTXSPY to create a new ETF (tentatively coming into effect from end July 2019). The new one is pretty much the same index as the Satrix STXPRO. Coreshares has promised to lower the relatively high TER with the merge (probably to compete with STXPRO). But you may as well flip a coin here between PTXTEN or STXPRO or watch the TERs once the new Coreshares ETF has settled in. For the dividend ETF, both DIVTRX and STXDIV are decent choices. DIVTRX targets more consistent yields in the longer term whereas STXDIV targets higher yields in the shorter term. And then again, although STXQUA is not strictly a dividend ETF, it's dividends are usually excellent. In my opinion, STXEMG has the most long term potential (although high risk), possibly even more so than tech shares. If you have a bit of appetite for risk, why not do 10% STXEMG, and then leave the ASHGEQ and go for STXWDM and/or S&P500. GLODIV has been doing really well lately and is likely to continue. Not so great in a TFIA though as the unpleasantly high foreign withholding tax on dividends negates a large chunk of the tax benefits though, but it still does have excellent capital gains, so maybe still even worth having in a TFIA. I personally like having a bit of a mix in my ETF portfolio. If I were you, I'd mix it up a little and make it a bit more exciting. What about something like: Local equities: 20% STX40 and 20% SMART Local property: 20% PTXTEN Emerging markets: 10% STXEMG Offshore: 15% CSP500 and 15% STXWDM (or alternatively 10% CSP500, 10% STXWDM and 10% GLODIV) Or if you don't like STXEMG but prefer slightly less emerging markets exposure, but still want some: Local equities: 20% STX40 and 20% SMART Local property: 20% PTXTEN Local dividends: 10% DIVTRX Offshore: 30% ASHGEQ
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  31. Haven’t seen a post under here for a while nor have I said anything for a while... Anyways- I’ve decided to give my ETFs some serious thought and this is what I’ve come up with (I’m open to all suggestions). I want my overall exposure to be 70% local and 30% offshore. Then, under both local and international holdings I was thinking about having 70% equities, 20% property and 10% dividends. Or not including the dividends because most of these would be under equities anyways and then having maybe a 80/20 split? For local: Satrix Top 40 and maybe the Coreshares Smart (equally weighted) - I know these are basically the same, but I don’t want over exposure to one share nor do I just want equally weighted, so I thought that mixing the two would give a bit of a better mix. Then for local property Coreshares PropTrax10 And if dividends perhaps Coreshares Aristocrats? International I’m a bit confused about because I’d still like a bit of emerging markets as well. So maybe: 1) Ashburton global 1200 2) Sygnia S&P 500 (I know Ashburton would have quite a few American companies in it already) For international property I’m thinking about Coreshares S&P Global And dividends would be Coreshares again or maybe an ETF from Satrix. Is this too complicated of a mix and should I rather just aim for 1 or 2 ETFs for local and international? I am trying to keep the portfolio moderately simple!
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