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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/04/2020 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    A market maker pays us to send them an order for shares. In return they guarantee execution at the current best price. The market maker can then use the order to get a competitive edge.
  2. 2 points
    Morning all, Which JSE broker offers trading in local bonds for private accounts? What are the costs involved? What are minimum trade sizes? Feedback appreciated.
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  5. 1 point
    Service/Product Description: Many professions, such as Chiropractors and Physiotherapists are required by their governing bodies (eg. Health Professionals Council as well as the Allied Health Professions Councils) to capture a consent form related to the COVID-19 pandemic when they treat their patients. This will create a mountain of paperwork that can easily get lost. [CUE intense music, cloud of smoke] Enter Online Forms - The solution to keep your consent forms and staff registers on a digital platform where they can't get lost and are safe from prying eyes. Simple capture form that is a "fill in the blanks" or "select an existing patient" and it creates a signed document easily! Location: https://organicode.co.za/onlineforms About us: OrganiCode hopes to build organic, lasting and growing relationships with customers using code. We do custom development, but also have a couple of inhouse products under construction with Online Forms being the first out for public consumption. Links (optional): https://organicode.co.za
  6. 1 point
    Greetings Money has been a cause of concern and i really want to do away with all this anxiety it brings to my day to day. Am always worried of running out but well am not here to vent. Moving on. From my research there are a couple of things i have to get right before i can ensure my finance future. Bank account Savings (Emergency Fund usually then merely savings[a quicker and more accessible sum]) investing The list might not be in its best order nor most detailed form but thats what i know for now(for the sake of this post). Would anyone please assist me with either information and or guidance with these three aspects and also help me on the right path. Tyme Bank would have been my go to bank. Its rates seem lovely. I understand that all the figures advertised may come to change sometime soon and what not but as for now and making a pick, the rate are a good enough starting point. Unfortunately i am not a South African citizen and have even considered other online banks but have not been too luckily finding one that is laid back on the fees and requires to open an account. Any ideas ? I have resorted to FNB EasyAccount(PAYU) and Standard bank(Student Achiever)(am currently a student doing my 3rd year and fear i might not be in South Africa for as much longer to build my savings in a South African bank to then take it out and perhaps suffer hefty fees. Am not sure how this all works but thats why i would like to get an international online bank where that concern is cancelled out) I hope to have my an FNB account forever and hope to bank from wherever in the world with then even later on and hence settled for them and my current EasyAccount before an upgrade to an different account. In the event i save with them(hopefully i do), i feel i have reason to foresee a longterm relationship. Investing, i want to use EasyEquities to make all my investments. They were suggested by Platinum Wealth and hey, i like them. I do not know if its better to have all i save and invest with them or not. Assuming there is a manner of saving i can do with tem in a TFSA. i really dont know how the platform works but i am dabbling in and with information to see what and how far we can go together. i trust that i can get some scrutiny here and get some answers as well. Dont take too long i dont have time. I want to spend it all on the market, i hear thats how you earn anything in the long run Regards PS:I understand it depends on what i dash dash dash lol. Please throw me in the deep end and give me a broad response lol assume everything
  7. 1 point
    For a while now I've been asking the question: "What percentage of my TFIA ETFs should be in 'foreign' indices?" Some people will immediately say "Put everything in foreign indices - the Rand is going to collapse or South Africa is going to be downgraded to junk" etc. And yet, the experts will typically tell you to put only 30% to 40% in foreign ETFs and the rest in local indices. So I've done a ton of study to find out why and the results surprised me - so much so that I have now changed the desired weightings of my TFIA ETF portfolio to allocate a greater percentage to local ETFs. Here's the thing. On the one hand, the Rand depreciates on average by 4% per year against the Dollar, and has pretty much done so since the time of Adam and Eve. Therefore, by buying ETFs of foreign indices, you are 'guaranteed' a 4% gain on your investment due to the weakening Rand. Now, on the other hand, let's look at foreign growth and interest on bonds, for example, where a 3% above-inflation is considered a good investment. Let's take England as an example. With its inflation close to 0%, a 3% return on an English investment would be considered "good." So if you had invested in an "England ETF, you would, by way of illustration, get your 0% inflation plus 3% return plus your 4% due to Rand depreciation, a total return of 7%. However, locally, it is South Africa's high inflation that makes it ideal for investment, which at first may seem counter-intuitive. Interest-bearing investments such as bonds and preference shares may also typically return inflation plus 3% - so with our 6% inflation, that gives a total return of 9%. And the JSE does much better than just inflation plus 3%! The other countries (outside of emerging markets) just don't have our inflation and therefore don't have the growth that the JSE index does. This is also why emerging markets are expected to give higher returns than developed markets in the long term. Secondly, putting more than say 40% in foreign indices means you are no longer diversified in the sense that if the Rands strengthens significantly, your portfolio collapses (and historically, it is highly unlikely to average a drop of more than 4% per year). On the other hand, the JSE index is not affected by the Rand in the same way, so whether the Rand drops or climbs, you're still guaranteed your above inflation growth on your local index ETFs. So betting too much on foreign indices is, in essence, going for a higher risk, but with lower returns, the exact opposite of what we should be doing. Of the academic studies I've read, most put the optimal risk-to-reward ratio for investing at 60% local and 40% foreign ETFs, and often support this with models. But now I finally understand why my previous 50% : 50% local : foreign split was considered high risk.
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